Thursday, February 15, 2018

Upcoming PD Session: Managing Me: A Developmental Continuum of Self-Regulation Supports

Managing Me:

A Mindfulness and Movement Program for Self-Management Using Movement and Mindfulness Strategies to Support Sensory Needs & Developmental Continuum of Sensory Supports.




When is it?
  • Wednesday, March 14th from 12:30-3:30pm

Where is it?
  • Miami Valley Regional Center 4801 Springfield Street, Dayton, OH 45431 in Room 300

Who should attend?
  • Educators interested in learning strategies for self-regulation instruction including occupational therapists, intervention specialists, counselors, special education directors, and paraprofessionals.

What should participants expect?
  • Self-regulation is a critical skill for any individual to learn to achieve personal dreams and reach desired goals. Unfortunately, self-regulation can be a challenging skill to learn if it does not develop naturally. This session will explore the developmental continuum of self-regulation instruction for improved success in teaching this complex skill. Attendees will have an opportunity to create a self-regulation support plan for an individual based upon age and developmental level. Attendees will also learn strategies for improved transfer and generalization of self-regulation skills.

How much does it cost to attend?
  • The cost is FREE to all districts who have already signed up for Miami Valley Autism Coaching Team services for the 2017-2018 school year. 

How do I sign up?
  • Contact our secretary Mary Fryman at mary.fryman@mcesc.org or (937) 236-9965 to register.

Monday, February 12, 2018

Around Town Round Up-- Life Skills Visuals

In addition to academic skills, many of our teams work each and every day to teach their students functional life skills to help them be more independent now and in the future. This week's Around Town Round Up will highlight some of the wonderful visuals we have seen teams use to teach life skills to their students.


Life skills are taught from preschool all the way up to high school and when the student transitions to a job placement. Some of the first life skills many of our teams focus on are self-care skills in the restroom. 

Toileting Sequence

Grooming Schedule
Jody Chick
Yellow Springs HS, Yellow Springs

Paper Towel Visual Reminder
Anne Rosenbaum
Orchard Park Elementary, Kettering

Handwashing Routine
Carrie Prickett
Jane Chance Elementary, Miamisburg

Teaching early life skills can also start in the cafeteria. We love this visual for helping students respond to Yes/No questions and make food choices in the lunch line. This team used a plastic 8x10 picture frame and changed the pictures daily. 

Greene Intensive Needs Classroom


Another common area for teaching life skills is in the kitchen. Many of our teams cook regularly to develop cooking skills and we also see lots of great visuals for organizing the kitchen and kitchen safety.
Jennifer McGowan
Smith Middle School, Vandalia

Kitchen Area Picture and Word Lablels
Jennifer Jette and Amanda Gallup
Vandalia-Butler HS, Vandalia

Stove Safety Sign
Tabitha Eaton
Main Elementary, Beavercreek

Kitchen Area Picture Symbol Labels
Tabitha Eaton
Main Elementary, Beavercreek

Microwave Color Cues
Rick Wical
Ankeney Middle School, Beavercreek


Some other great visual reminders we have seen include a reminder for what lunch money is needed each day:
Jennifer Jette
Vandalia-Butler HS, Vandalia


a script for answering the classroom phone,
Robbie Whorton
Trotwood-Madison HS, Trotwood


and visuals for doing laundry.
Rick Wical
Ankeney Middle School, Beavercreek

Many of our high school teams are working on vocational life skills and need supports for building these skills within the classroom and the community. ALIST Teacher Robbie Whorton has a great job board that she uses in her classroom with time cards for each student and individualized job assignments with descriptions. What a great idea!
Robbie Whorton
Trotwood-Madison HS, Trotwood 






The students in ALIST teacher Jennifer Jette's class have a variety of community job placements that they go to each week. Jennifer provides her students with visual checklist to help them gather necessary materials needed for each placement. 

Jennifer Jette
Vandalia-Butler HS, Vandalia

Visual Supports is an Evidence-Based Practice for students with autism so we love to see so many fabulous examples in the classrooms we coach!

Friday, February 9, 2018

Upcoming PD Session: "The Problem that Doesn't Happen":Using Antecedent-Based Intervention and Sensory Solutions to PREVENT Interfering Behavior

"The Problem that Doesn't Happen":
Using Antecedent-Based Intervention and Sensory Solutions to PREVENT Interfering Behavior



When is it?
  • Wednesday, March 14th from 8:30-11:30am

Where is it?
  • Miami Valley Regional Center 4801 Springfield Street, Dayton, OH 45431 in Room 300

Who should attend?
  • Educators interested in learning strategies for preventing problem behaviors including intervention specialists, counselors, school psychologists, therapists, special education directors, occupational therapists, and paraprofessionals.

What should participants expect?
  • Join us to learn more about the implementation of antecedent based interventions across educational environments to inform your planning for classroom instruction, behavior support, social skills practice, and self management systems. Interactive case studies will help participants learn how to optimize student motivation and engagement by applying ABI strategies, including: schedules and routines, preactivity priming, providing student choice, selection of materials, and environmental design.

How much does it cost to attend?
  • The cost is FREE to all districts who have already signed up for Miami Valley Autism Coaching Team services for the 2017-2018 school year. 

How do I sign up?
  • Contact our secretary Mary Fryman at mary.fryman@mcesc.org or (937) 236-9965 to register.

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Regulation Rendezvous-- Breathing to Relax

Learning to control one’s breath can lower anxiety, support clear and focused thought, and assist in self-management of emotions. Today's Regulation Rendezvous will provide a variety of strategies for implementing deep breathing in your classroom. 


Best Breathing Techniques for Children

Deep, full breaths increase energy, bring calm to the mind and body, and help us to concentrate and focus. Teachers can teach deep breathing to students if they explain the breathing by using simple language that kids can understand and give them fun ways to practice.

Air Walk: 

Students lie on their backs, with legs straight and arms at the sides, looking up. Lift the right leg up, while also raising the left arm, as you inhale deeply. Exhale, as you bring each arm and leg down. Repeat by inhaling as you lift the left leg and right arm, then exhale down, and repeat on the other side.

YouTube



Image result for blowing milk bubblesPursed Lips Breathing

Teach students to inhale completely, then slowly exhale with a cup of milk and a straw. The emphasis should be on releasing the breath as slowly as possible. Instruct children to take a deep breath in, then slowly breathe it out through the straw, creating bubbles on top of the milk. Bubbles should be small and controlled, as opposed to creating a huge one that pops.






Belly Breathing


Help children visualize deep belly breathing by using a favorite stuffed animal. Children should lie on their backs, placing the stuffed animal on their belly. Instruct them to take a deep breath in, moving the animal up as high as possible. Then, ask them to exhale slowly, moving the stuffed animal as low as possible. Ask them to create “waves” with their breathing, bringing their animal for a ride, up on the inhale, down on the exhale. Focus on a smooth, steady ride for the animal.
YouTube



Breathing Folder


Our team has created a breathing folder to provide a visual for students to use when practicing their deep breathing. To use the folder, take the paper strip from the beginning pocket, follow the numbers as you inhale for 3 seconds and exhale for 6 seconds, then place the strip in the ending pocket. 

We love how ALIST teacher Emily Ottmar incorporated the breathing folder into her classroom calming sensory space.
Emily Ottmar
Stevenson Elementary, Mad River Local Schools


Other teachers also use the folder as a class-wide support at transitions after students have lined up or before starting a test. 

Breathing Apps


There are a variety of free and paid breathing apps available. 


Breathe2Relax (FREE)

Breathing Zone ($3.99)
Universal Breathing ($4.99)
Relax Lite (FREE)
Breathe, Think, Do with Sesame (FREE)


GoNoodle Breathing Videos


Did you know GoNoodle has a section dedicated to breathing videos? After signing in, click Categories at the top and then under the Movement Type heading click the Breathe button to find dozens of great options!


Two of our favorite GoNoodle Breathing videos are from the Empower Tools series. We love these because they provide students with visuals to help them focus when practicing their breathing. We have seen some teams even use a Hoberman Sphere in their classroom. 

Have Compassion

Relieve Anxiety

Friday, February 2, 2018

Organization Station-- Student Material Organization

Organization is key to making sure your classroom runs smoothly. Having organization systems in place for student materials helps students know where to locate needed materials and can help build independence. Today's Organization Station will highlight ideas we have seen throughout the Miami Valley for organizing student materials.



In some classrooms, there are community supplies shared between students that can be organized by location.
Kathy Timmerman
Fairbrook Elementary, Beavercreek




Technology can be found in almost all of the classrooms we coach so organizational supports for these materials are important too!
Megan Kelly
Beavertown Elementary, Kettering

Becky Schwab
Eastmont Elementary, Dayton

Laura Brown
Perrin Woods Elementary, Springfield




Most of the students we coach have individualized supports to help them be successful in the classroom. Some individualized supports may include sensory fidgets, visual contract, headphones, adaptive scissors or writing utensils, or schedules. Having a designated location for their materials helps to make them readily accessible when needed.

Rachel Hatton
Normandy Elementary, Centerville

Individualized student book bins containing books at the student's reading level are also a great organizational support that we see in many classrooms.
Kim Hampton
Broadway Elementary, Tipp City

Kathy Timmerman
Fairbrook Elementary, Beavercreek



Edible reinforcers may also be individualized. We love this organizing hack from Little Miss Kim's Class!
Click here for more tips for edible reinforcers


Many of the students we coach travel between classrooms for various subjects throughout the day. They may go into an inclusion class, visit the resource room, or have departmentalized subjects. It is important that any individualized supports can be readily available for them in all environments. We love these portable ideas for these transitions.
Lisa Sword
McKinley Elementary, Xenia



Having individualized anchor activities for times when students finish early or need to set aside assignments to complete later is a great way to fill ragged times. When students learn the procedure for these anchor activities it also cuts down on interruptions if students are all working and transitioning at their own pace.
Heather Balkcom
Springcreek Primary, Piqua

Jennifer Jette
Vandalia-Butler HS, Vandalia

Alexis Willis
Snyder Park Elementary, Springfield